Backup Exec GRT Exchange Backups really slow...

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    Recently switched to GRT backups of Exchange 2010 and the speed of the backup went from:

    1:45 minutes @ 1,450 mb/min with 100 - 110 gigs of data

    To

    7:15 minutes @ 273 mb/min with 100 - 110 gigs of data

    Exchange version is 14.0722.000

    B2D folder is on a Dell Power Vault MD3220i SAN Raid 10 (8 500g 7200k inline sas)

    I would expect some additional slowing for additional processing of GRT info for item level restores, but this is unacceptable.

    I did some searches and it seems that there are many others with the same problem…

    Thanks
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